About The Well-being Doc

This is an evidence-based practice site, as all of the resources on this site draw upon evidence-based therapies, as well as from psychology, neuroscience and public health, and include a socio-ecological systems perspective.


March 2020 site update – this site has been fully updated to provide specific well-being support for the current home confinement period


Below is some more information about The Well-being Doc.

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This site is called The Well-being Doc, as it documents well-being activities for you to try out. It also can document your own well-being feedback and comments on the activities, if you want to share them on the site. This is very helpful for others on their well-being journey.

Use the CONTACT PAGE for your well-being feedback and comments, and these will be posted on this site’s Well-being Community Message Page.


The resources on this site develop our skills for mental health, resilience and well-being.

All of the resources on this site draw upon evidence-based research practice.

Ongoing stress and emotional distress creates the potential for long term negative consequences on our emotions, feelings and behaviours. See the understanding stress page for more information about this.

bluemountains1There are number of scientific evidence-based psychological therapies (drawn from the third wave of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy) that are designed to address these types of barriers to our well-being. These therapies include Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy and Meta-cognitive Therapy (Hayes and Hofmann 2017). The resources on this site draw upon these evidence-based therapies, as well as from psychology, neuroscience and public health, and include a socio-ecological systems perspective.

To let you know that this is evidence-based well-being practice, there is a sample of these scientific research references across the site.


March 2020 site update information

mancovidsocialisolation1This site is being regularly updated to provide support for our mental health and well-being in the face of the coronavirus (COVID-19) home confinement period.

The coronavirus pandemic is a period of uncertainty and rapid change. It delivers a range of psychosocial stresses, that we are ALL facing together whilst we each do our bit to help tackle the COVID-19 outbreak, for example, by staying at home.

The resources on this site are designed to provide support to help us cope with stress and emotional distress, as well as build psychosocial resilience in the face of COVID-19. Using these site resources can strengthen our mental health and well-being in this challenging situation, building capacity and social capital for working with the complexities that arise from COVID-19, such as the psychosocial stresses.

So add any of these resources on this site that interest you to your DAILY WORKOUT, especially if you are in confinement at home. Like any exercise routine, practise them regularly, to strengthen your mental health and well-being in the current situation.


Well-being Community Messages and Resources

support1The well-being community page on this site has links to additional well-being resources from other organisations who are focused on providing support in this period.

PLEASE SEND ANY WELL-BEING COMMUNITY MESSAGES AND RESOURCES so they can be uploaded on the community page on this site TO SUPPORT OTHERS. 

Please send any resources, tips, ideas and activities you are using for the home confinement period. Also send any well-being resources that have been designed by organisations you know about, in response to the current psychosocial challenges we are all facing together.  These resources will be posted on this site, to share with the community, on the  the well-being community messages page.

Please use the contact page to share these resources.

Working together can help all of us to get through.

SOURCE: World Health Organization 2016


 

This site is maintained by Rachel Parker FRSPH, a senior mental health consultant and researcher based at DECIPHER, Cardiff University.